All Reviews

Based on 588 reviews
71%
(415)
25%
(148)
4%
(21)
1%
(3)
0%
(1)
Big - Just Big

Lovecraftian fans will dig it. The game play is fairly easy to come to grips with, a phase-based process for each round. This is a game that does take a bit of setting up and I found that Folded-Space inserts have helped a huge amount with reducing the time needed. Each player chooses a character and you have different Elder Gods to go up against. Phases shift (there are four of them0) and this causes gates to open and monsters to spawn like vermin. This is a game that requires solid teamwork, and even when that goes well, it is a challenge. The solo play aspect is excellent, with perfect challenges to really keep the player down to Earth. This is my go-to Lovecraft fix and one that I have rarely beaten. With the narrative of the other Lovecraftian games from Fantasy Flight taking a bit of a back seat, Eldritch Horror creates a different vibe that encompasses the globe and beyond. And expansions....so many wonderful expansions!

Waves of Undead

Even the so-called "tutorial mission" has ominous precursors to the more advanced missions that await. It looks daunting, with a rule book that basically qualifies as a medium-sized magazine. Don't be put off - the mechanic and game play is smooth and easy to get to grips with. I found that learning by doing was the best approach and use the rules as a reference. This game has endless re-play quality with eight different characters and a tonne of cards that will keep you on your toes. It is a great game and I loved it. I am glad that I held out for the second edition and have really enjoyed wiping out masses of zombies.

The production quality is top notch. This is a lot of game for the money. You will need a bigger table. Awesome game!

R
MicroMacro: Crime City
Rory Laubscher
Did not disappoint.

I had a lot more fun with this than I expected. As a previous review states, it certainly is "Where's Wally" on steroids. So much fine detail and the cases we've done so far were really intriguing and created a real sense of achievement with each successive deduction made.
In short, you have a HUGE black and white map in front of you, and each case (crime) begins with a location that you have to find. From there it's a series of questions that need answers and you check if you're correct by reviewing the grid location of the answer. It's a lot of fun, with a number of twists and "A-ha" moments that I loved. Cases are rated in difficulty from 1 - 5 stars. We've worked up to 3 star cases and loved it. Can't wait to see what makes the hard cases so tough.

Almost Perfect (X-COM the dice game)

Under Falling Skies is an X-COM like game with a very simple objective, complete your research before time runs out or your base gets destroyed. Each turn you roll dice (workers) and place them in your base; the room you place a die in determines the effect (shooting alien ships, generating power, researching, building robots) and the number is the degree to which it is done, but it is a trade-off because alien ships in the same column as that room move down a number of spaces equal to the number on the die. To complicate matters more, you need to unlock your bases rooms and you must place one of your five dice in each of the columns of your base during each turn.

The game is very dynamic and often you will have a broad strategy but will have to adapt it based on the dice roll of the current i.e. some turns may be fantastic for shooting down alien ships, others for doing swaths of research, or building towards a big play. I went into this game expecting to be destroyed by bad dice rolls, and while they do happen, in many situations in which I lost, I found myself to have executed sub-optimal plays and was only 1 - 2 turns away from completing the mission. This game is very well balanced at normal difficulty and if you're a masochist, it can cater to that too.

The only reason I'm not giving it 5 stars is I am hoping they release an expansion where you get to develop your own base over the duration of the campaign and use the research to unlock powers in a tech-tree; I will reserve 5 stars for the day it taps that potential. Under Falling Skies is a very enjoyable and dynamic puzzle, the replay value is phenomenal (17 cities - each with their own base configuration times 13 missions, equals 221 unique games, and that's without factoring in tile permutations and specialists abilities), and it is presented in such a neat fashion. I look forward to CGE's next dedicated solo gaming experience but until that day, I've got plenty to keep me busy right here!

90% jigsaw, 10% ‘escape’ story

Compared to other ‘escape room’ style games, this Ravensburger ‘escape puzzle’ is definitely more jigsaw than escape style game.
A somewhat challenging puzzle, with some interesting quirks and tricks, enough to interest and challenge jigsaw fans. The semi-gloss finish and dark colour palette can be difficult to see under lights.
However, the ‘escape puzzles’ on completion are not fantastic. As the puzzle is multi-lingual, the escape puzzles are limited to shapes, images, items, Roman numerals etc. The goal of the ‘escape’ isn’t entirely clear, and solvers may have to rely heavily on the online clues.
If you’re looking for a great escape room style game, there are better options out there.
If you’re ok with a challenging jigsaw puzzle with a few quirks, and then being led through an add-on story on completion, then this puzzle might be worth considering.

B
Sprawlopolis
Boris Kirov
Fantastic solo

An easy to learn and set-up but super hard to master. Sprawlopolis is a compact solo-coop card game that will make your brain sweat. Each one of the 18 cards included offers a different victory conditions making this little game a hugely replayable one. Highly recommended as a filler city-builder, one that you'll be going back to for months and months to come.

Cthulhu Yahtzee? Yes please!

Elder Sign is a different take on the Fantasy Flight Cthulhu universe. There’s some familiar faces among the investigator characters and Old Ones, but the mechanic is completely different to your typical Arkham move-and-fight/investigate: this game is pretty much pure dice chucking pattern matching. Use items, spells, clues and abilities to impact the dice results, and try not to go insane or be devoured. This base game follows a loose story of investigating the Arkham museum, but ultimately it’s all about the dice.
Like most of the Fantasy Flight Cthulhu offerings, Elder Sign can be fiendishly hard, until you learn how to best risk-manage the tasks, and use your items to best effect.
100% recommend adding on the Unseen Forces expansion too, for some great extra content and mechanics that fit right in.

Cthulhu Yahtzee? Yes please!

Elder Sign is a different take on the Fantasy Flight Cthulhu universe. There’s some familiar faces among the investigator characters and Old Ones, but the mechanic is completely different to your typical Arkham move-and-fight/investigate: this game is pretty much pure dice chucking pattern matching. Use items, spells, clues and abilities to impact the dice results, and try not to go insane or be devoured. This base game follows a loose story of investigating the Arkham museum, but ultimately it’s all about the dice.
Like most of the Fantasy Flight Cthulhu offerings, Elder Sign can be fiendishly hard, until you learn how to best risk-manage the tasks, and use your items to best effect.
100% recommend adding on the Unseen Forces expansion too, for some great extra content and mechanics that fit right in.

A fun activity-type game

A unique time-bending map leads you through 16 cases in this curiously crime-ridden city inhabited by anthropomorphic animal characters. The cases have varying difficulties.

This has become a perfect end-of-gaming-session activity, doing a couple of cases at a time.
Definitely not a ‘game’ as such, more of an ‘activity’. Best with a group of 2-4, to get your heads together to pore over the HUGE, minutely detailed map. Some rather adult themes (murder etc) so be aware of that.

I’ve used coloured game cubes (from Clank!) to mark the locations on the map, very useful and makes it much more visual.

Overall, a wonderfully fun and quirky activity that is a perfect start or end to a game session.

A fun activity-type game

A unique time-bending map leads you through 16 cases in this curiously crime-ridden city inhabited by anthropomorphic animal characters. The cases have varying difficulties.

This has become a perfect end-of-gaming-session activity, doing a couple of cases at a time.
Definitely not a ‘game’ as such, more of an ‘activity’. Best with a group of 2-4, to get your heads together to pore over the HUGE, minutely detailed map. Some rather adult themes (murder etc) so be aware of that.

I’ve used coloured game cubes (from Clank!) to mark the locations on the map, very useful and makes it much more visual.

Overall, a wonderfully fun and quirky activity that is a perfect start or end to a game session.

J
Catacombs of Karak
James Dickinson
Fantastic Game

My kids love it and often want to replay it. The rules are simple and depending on the characters you choose it can be a very fast game. Just ordered the expansion pack.

Plenty of Strategy and Depth

Best new game I've tried in a while. Don't be fooled by the look, a hex version of Carcassonne you might think. Well, the basic concept is similar, lay tiles and complete your features, but this game brings it to a new dimension. You draw your double sided tiles choosing from 2 piles, and you always have 2 in your hand, which means you are much more in control of your map development. Placing hex tiles is more involving. Many scoring mechanisms means that you can go for different strategies, adding plenty of depth. Bonus points to steal from the opponent, Mountains and Coral reef chains, Caravans and Ships trade routes, Waypoint tokens, and the special Whirlpool/Volcano tile.
My wife and I love it, but mind you it's a brainy game, not an easy domino.

A spicy game using a range of familiar mechanics, suitable for many different tastes.

Take a dash of deck building, add a sprinkling of worker placement, a slight squeeze of resource management and then serve with a fresh tech tree on the side. Need a bit more? Flip the board over for a experience ideal for those with more complex tastes and an experience which takes a little longer to digest.

With enough options to give you a different experience each time. This will appeal with a theme familiar to new gamers while having enough complexity to satisfy the more experienced.

A spicy game using a range of familiar mechanics, suitable for many different tastes.

Take a dash of deck building, add a sprinkling of worker placement, a slight squeeze of resource management and then serve with a fresh tech tree on the side. Need a bit more? Flip the board over for a experience ideal for those with more complex tastes and an experience which takes a little longer to digest.

With enough options to give you a different experience each time. This will appeal with a theme familiar to new gamers while having enough complexity to satisfy the more experienced.

R
Space Park
Rob Rangi
Parks in Space!

Space Park is the smaller, sleeker, and spiritual successor to PARKS. Anyone familiar with that game will enjoy the smaller footprint, simplified mechanisms and quick game play. It is PARKS lite IMHO but with a race element which adds a new twist. Despite having both PARKS + Nightfall, I am keeping Space Park in my collection because it's a great gateway game as well as an easy transition for those who have played and enjoyed PARKS. Plus i's Space. Who doesn't like Space? :)

Fun, Interactive, Souped Up Version of Wheres Wally

I managed to get my hands on a copy of the elusive MicroMacro when Hobby Games got their first order in.
It's super easy to learn, interactive, immersive, fun and will get you thinking!
We played the first case and were hooked, did about 6 in the first play but could have happily played through them all!
Definitely recommend playing with others to with this one, easily playable solo but more fun with others!
Get your hands on in it when you can!

Fun solo/coop game

Really fun!! This awesome game give you the chance to play as your favorite hero, against all the villains from the marvel universe. Core box is a must, but after that you can expand anyway you feel like.

Fun solo/coop game

This awesome game give you the chance to play as your favorite hero, against all the villains from the marvel universe. Core box is a must, but after that you can expand anyway you feel like.

R
Rat-A-Tat Cat
Rory Laubscher
Great for young kids.

This card game is rapidly becoming a favourite of our 6 year old.
It's easy to learn and incorporates skills like memory and addition, a little luck and just enough "take that" to put a real smile on my daughter's face when she gets to take one of my good cards.
Even better, there's enough to keep an adult on their toes without getting bored.
Rounds don't last long and setup is simple (4 face down cards for every player).
Definitely one worth picking up if you're looking for something worth playing with young gamers.

Brilliant Game from the Mind that Brought Us Parks

In Space Park the game is played on a communal board which is divided into seven locations, placed in a randomised circle; each location has a different simple action; most will allow a player to gain resources, and there will be locations that allow a player to do something very specific like take a card, or trade in resources to build a card from their hand. Cards serve two purposes, firstly points, and secondly, they will either give additional scoring opportunities or abilities, such as reducing the costs of certain types of cards in the future.

On their turn a player can perform one of the actions that are available under one of the three rockets on the board, after which the rocket on the action they chose moves one step clockwise around the track, giving the next player a different set of actions to choose from. Given how the rockets move, you will be acutely aware of the options you are handing the next player and based on what they’ve been doing, you may have a fairly good idea of what they want to do next; this results in equal measures of trying to achieve what you want to do as much as trying to not hand your opponents what they want.

The player with the most victory points from Badge cards and XP tokens by the end of the game wins the game.

There is a bit of luck with the cards that come out, but with that said, the game lasts 20-30 minutes, and the game moves at a good clip with player turns moving fast; everything has been so well stream-lined in this game. Bottom line, Space Park is a delightful, absolutely gorgeous and intuitive game that is great for families or gamers who want a bit of lighter fare.

11 Slices Up

New York Slice is a family-weight game based around the idea of 'I cut, you choose'. Each player will get at least one turn where they get to divide up an 11-slice pizza however they see fit, and then in player order, each player gets to choose one of the portions; the only catch is that the player that divided the pizza gets the last section that remains. At the end of the game players go through each type (topping) of pizza; whoever has the most slices of a type, gets the corresponding number of points.

This is a really good ice breaker and filler game as all the decisions are relatively simple, but meaningful. The number of slices of each type of pizza and the number of points that type scores are one and the same, so no memory required.

L
Pandemic
Laura Mcleod
Lot's of fun

The variations in the game are such that we can play it over and over again. The cooperative aspect means I don't have to ref as many fights :)

L
Pandemic
Laura Mcleod
Lot's of fun

The variations in the game are such that we can play it over and over again. The cooperative aspect means I don't have to ref as many fights :)

A Timeless Classic in Every Sense of the Word

Lost Cities revolves around a deck of numbered cards ranging from 2 - 10 in five colours (suits). During each turn a player plays one card from their hand, either playing it to an expedition on their side of a table (a row for cards of that colour), or to the matching colour discard pile in the middle of the table; if the player has already played cards of that colour, the next card must be a higher number than the previous card. The player then either draws the top card of the deck or the top card from one of the coloured discard piles in the middle of the table.

Up to this point it sounds like a standard card game, and you get to scoring... At the end of the game each player adds up all the cards in each expedition they played cards to and then subtract 20 points, this is how many points they get (they can even go into the negative). On top of that you can play wager cards which multiply the final score of an expedition, for better or worse, but they must be played before any cards of that colour are played.

Lost Cities revolves around balancing on a tightrope between denying your opponent points while not self-sabotaging and scoring your own points; the game ultimately feels like it has the strategy level of a trick-taking game while also playing mathematical chicken. Normally I am not a fan of Mr Knizia's mathematically flawless games as they can feel very clinical and sadly I put this classic off for so long due to that fact, but good Doctor here has crafted a perfectly honed blade of a game. Everything in the design of Lost Cities screams a classic design that would feel just as at home coming out last week as it would over a century ago using nothing but a standard deck of playing cards (providing it had a fifth suit).

More than just as 7 Wonders Alternative

Addressing the elephant in the room, this game is often compared to 7 Wonders and it is in the sense that you draft and build cards. Unlike 7 Wonders, in which when you get a card you must immediately choose to either pay to build it or discard it, in Wonderful World you draft a hand of cards; each round after all the cards have been drafted, for each of your cards you choose whether to slate it for construction or discard it for the depicted resource. The gameplay allows you to take cards you want for later and work away at completing them over the course of the game.

Once everyone has chosen what to do with their cards the production phase takes place, and here is where the game swaps over to engine building. The constructed buildings of all players produce resources in the same order (grey > black > green > gold > blue), and here is where the magic kicks in, for example if you had a building that produces black resources, but it needs grey resources to be completed, the grey resources could be used to finish the building as they are produced first step and then completed building would produce the black resources in the following stage. Planning and optimisation is king.

This game would get a perfect score for me except for one minor ding, although it is rare it is possible to end up with cards at the start of the game that you cannot build into the solid foundation of an engine and ends up setting you back a bit. It would have been nice to see different decks used for early, mid, and late game. As it stands, I love It's a Wonderful World, it is easily my favourite drafting game and for me personally, destroys 7 Wonders. I prefer the much more deliberate nature of engine building over time, planning for the future, and planning is the key word here, not reacting.